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The Myth of Trust, The Must of Trust and the Role of Technology

Myth: Trust is earned.

Truth: Trust is not earned. Trust is granted.

If I can earn your trust, then you have given away power to me. If I can earn your trust, then trust is something that can be quantified, and all I have to do is reach a goal, a standard, a 100% of something that necessarily releases what you have. Trust doesn’t work that way.

Trust is something that you grant. You can give it or not give it. Trust is in your control, an expression of your power and will.

If someone failed you, and then asked, “What can I do to get your trust back,” I doubt you gave them a clear list of tasks to complete.

Trust is an opportunity you extend for someone to act in your best interest. Trust is a bridge you are willing to cross with another from the known to the unknown. When you get on an airplane, you trust the pilot to get you there safely, and to get you to a place in a way you could not on your own.

Do-It-Yourself industries rely on undermining the trust you put in professionals. Where you once relied on someone to act in your best interest and to do so with a knowledge you did not possess, DIY now gives you the knowledge you need to act in your own interest (while trusting that the knowledge they provide is accurate). It’s not that professionals are bad; some just aren’t needed like they once were. Trust is rooted in need.

Consumers are moving their trust away from institutions and toward individuals. It is a major shift. Before, we relied on the good name of companies. Now, corporate reputation as a whole is suspect. Consumers either rely on individuals directly (e.g. Airbnb, which averages 5 email exchanges before booking, vs. hotels) or indirectly (hence, the rise of peer reviews).

Trust cannot be earned, but it can be triggered. How do companies today trigger the trust of the public?

The Musts of Trust

1.    Don’t try to build trust. Trigger trust.

Building trust is an exercise of persuasion. Being trustworthy is an expression of character. Persuasion seeks to have you act in another’s best interest. Character will act in our best interest.

Trust is triggered by four trustworthy character-istics. Not any one of these is a magic bucket that, once filled, requires the trust of another. Each one of these is a signal, for reasons you cannot predict, to another’s mind and emotion that they can grant something of their self to you.

Competence: Do you have what it takes to act in my interest or get me to a place in a way that I cannot?

Consistency: Will you be responsive to me and act in a way that I can count on you?

Care: Are you really driven to meet my need or is your service just a camouflage for your own profit?

Congruence: Does your behavior match your stated intentions?

Trust is not necessarily revoked because of failure. Studies have shown that loyalty to a company is highest not among those who never had a problem with a company, but with those who had an issue rightly resolved. Why? Because competence is but one of four triggers, and if, when you fail, you are responsive, genuinely caring, and living up to what you project, then trust might remain in place.

2.    Technology that triggers trust amplifies decisions rather than dictates decisions.

Technology does things for people, and it has a growing role in deciding things for people (algorithms). Your company will be more human when it chooses to enhance decision-making (honoring a trust to be granted) rather than to impose a decision (trying to require trust).

Customer knowledge (which informs what you offer) plus multiple options (which maintains your customer’s power of choice) is the equation for relational business versus transactional business. And the more you seem human (relational), the more you will trigger trust.

The Role of Technology

Your company’s technology serves the triggers. Technology is not only about you being more efficient; technology empowers your ability to be trustworthy. IT must do both – serve you, and strengthen your competence, consistency, care and congruence.

Failure to utilize technology to both serve you and strengthen you will cause consumers to entrust their needs elsewhere, and neither one of you may be able to articulate why – and that’s because trust is not a commodity a company can measure and attain, but a part of a consumer that they willingly, if not consciously, give.

3 Building Blocks That Keep Your Board On Solid Footing And Grateful For You

Board members are becoming increasingly aware of their own accountability and risk in the event of a cybersecurity breach. By 2020, 100% of large companies will be asked by the Board to report on cybersecurity, an increase of 60% in four years.

What boards are not asking for is a lot of detail they will not understand and that will just cloud their ability to make good decisions on your behalf. Instead, I recommend shaping the board around three important mindsets which I treat as building blocks.

Building Block 1: Cybersecurity is about Risk

The risk is no longer just an IT issue, but an enterprise issue with costs and penalties at every level, from company mission and profit, to employment, and to financial and legal consequences.

Risks are proportionate to threats, vulnerabilities and consequences.

Therefore, boards need to be informed about

  • Evolving threats
  • Changes in business needs and their association to new security risks
  • Increasing regulations
  • Policy updates
  • Geographic changes in which services have been moved to outsider or cloud applications

Building Block 2: Cybersecurity is about Risk Mitigation

Mitigation is about reducing the threats, vulnerabilities and consequences your company faces.

And it starts with the Board. Often overlooked is their own vulnerability. The Board is privy to a lot of information, much of it confidential, and much of it being communicated on their own devices. Security measures need to be in place for them that reflect the policies and procedures of the company.

By extension the Board needs to be aware of how training and education is implemented and practiced among all employees.

Building Block 3: Cybersecurity is about Risk Mitigation Strategy

A number of boards are now discussing the value of having a cybersecurity specialist on the board in order to bridge the gap between the board’s lack of knowledge and the increasing expertise they must have in front of them. In the least, they must address who in the company reports to them. Ideally, it is the same person each time. Boards are increasingly aware of the time they must now give to cybersecurity issues in their meetings, and to being able to understand these essentials:

  • Is our budget congruent with our security need?
  • Are we in compliance?
  • Is the Business Continuity Plan and Disaster Recovery Plan in place and what are the results of the tests of it?
  • What risks must we avoid, what risks are we willing to accept, and what risks must we transfer through insurance?
  • Are the right people in the right places?

The CIO that builds these into the working knowledge of the Board will find a Board and CEO ready to build back into them and the IT needs the CIO represents.

Which of these has been most critical in your own work with boards? Tell us below.

Six Major IT Functions You Cannot Do Without and Must Perform At Optimal Level

Your body is amazing.

It is comprised of six major systems in which all functions interact with each other. Not one survives without the other. Remove one from your body? You die.

(Just in case you were wondering: Skeletal, Muscular, Nervous, Digestive, Respiratory and Circulatory).

IT management also consists of six major functions that interact with each other. Failure to develop and maintain health in these, and you invite serious dysfunction; weak in one weakens all.

Communication

How does your IT leader communicate with peers and executives?

How do you coordinate when IT cannot make a decision alone?

How does IT partner with senior managers in strategic development and complementary focal points?

How does the Board understand IT issues and what must they know to make appropriate decisions?

People

How do you ensure that you hire, develop and retain the best talent?

How do you manage the gap of knowledge between managers and tech specialists?

How do you navigate leadership of highly smart and variously motivated employees?

How do you know what your talented people can or cannot do?

Cost and Accounting

How do you get the right people in decisions and safeguard what is in the interest of the company and not just a particular department?

What determines value for IT and where to invest for maximum return?

How do you know what projects to invest in and what determines there priority?

Project

When do you know to expand the scope of a project or not?

How will you budget while allowing for uncertainty in project time and cost?

What budget considerations do you make for the need to learn during the course of a project?

What is the chain of communication for when problems arise?

Partner and Services

What is essential in the agreements you structure with outside partners and vendors?

What is the selection process?

How do you know what must stay within the company’s walls and what need not be?

Who will we use for outside eyes?

Infrastructure

How much do you invest in maintenance versus new capabilities, and how do you know when new is needed?

What is your Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Plan?

How much will you invest in redundancy?

How do you identify emerging threats and opportunities?

How does emerging technology integrate into your strategic plans?

In coming weeks, I will address each of these. But a major takeaway for today is, every company needs to bring in outside eyes to evaluate each of these functions: We don’t ignore our body’s systems, and we don’t ignore our company’s IT systems. The last thing you want is an IT emergency that could have been avoided.

Can You Trust Someone to “Vouch” for Your Company?

Can you really have faith in everything that’s on the internet? Of course, not. But, that being said, company leaders need to put an awful lot of trust in their employees, the people they’ve hired to manage their network, and the infrastructure and reliability of the network itself. But, if you’re expected to trust so many different factors revolving around your business, while also being told not to be too careful to trust everything else — like WiFi connections or suspicious emails — then how can you navigate your way around all this?

These days, having someone to vouch for you, or having someone vouch for the people you’ll be working with, is one of the oldest, yet most reliable ways to secure your network and your company. Going off of that, it’s equally important to have extra eyes helping to look out for your company at all times.

If the Dark Web does it, so can you?

If you’re familiar with the Dark Web, “trustworthy” wouldn’t necessarily be the first term you would use to describe it. But, believe it or not, sellers on Tor need to be verified for the authenticity of their products as well as themselves as users before being able to complete a transaction. This is done by having current members introduce new members through a system of vouching. Without this, you can’t get onto the site.

So, if the Dark Web relies on some form of vouching in order to be able to trust their users, then surely large companies should be doing something similar. It’s not enough to just have certain cybersecurity protocols in place — although, those are important as well. If you can incorporate a system of vouching along with placing outside eyes wherever you can, then you’ll be protected in ways that machines can’t protect you.

Apply this system to vendors and employees

Of course, companies find ways to vouch for people, too, similar to how it’s done on the Dark Web. When we hire someone, HR usually asks for references, recommendations, and will maybe even do some snooping around on social media to get to know more about this person. The same goes if you’re working with third-party vendors or onboarding and offboarding part-time employees. You need to know who you’re going to be working with. You can go this route, but you can also ask around to see who else has worked with the people you’re planning to work with. These days, it’s very easy to check a person’s or a company’s reputation online, so you can take advantage of this.

Hire someone to look out for you

If your Facebook account gets hacked and your friends find out because they are getting spam messages from you, it’s likely that one of those friends will notify you of this so that you are aware. In a sense, this is a form of informal (and free) cybersecurity. You’re too busy running things at the company to be concerned with staying on top of security, employees, networks, risks, etc. Therefore, hiring managed services to help you keep an eye on things internally and externally can help ensure that nothing fishy comes up.

Down to checks and balances

This idea of vouching further enforces the notion of checks and balances in a company who cares about its cybersecurity. A managed service provider checks the IT team, the IT team checks HR, the company checks the employees, and vigilant, trustworthy employees can keep their eyes out for the company. While a professional certainly helps handle this process at the expert level, it never hurts to rely on people you trust to keep things in balance.

Why Healthcare Industries Are Seeing More Data Breaches

No company is immune to a data breach. These days, no matter what industry a company falls under, there is always the risk of something happening. If companies aren’t taking the proper measures to manage their networks, a data breach can really set a company back, if not taking it off the market completely. Because of this, more and more companies have realized the importance of investing in an outsourced CIO to help prevent problems from occurring. Why, is it then, that we are seeing continuous data breaches in the healthcare industry, and why are the problems not being solved?

Well, it’s not so simple, and there may be several reasons as to why the healthcare industry is experiencing more data breaches than ever before.

Data Breach Statistics

In order to really understand how data breaches are impacting the healthcare industry, one would need to look at the actual numbers. According to the annual HIMMS Cybersecurity Survey, 75% of the 239 healthcare respondents surveyed reported that their organization experienced a “significant security incident in the past 12 months.” What’s interesting is that 96% of those respondents said that the organizations were able to identify the threat actor. But, as more than half of these respondents reported that their organization has a clearly defined budget that is allocated to cybersecurity and are seemingly on top of their network, it makes people wonder why these data breaches are continuing to happen at such high rates.

Healthcare Industry as a Target

Despite the fact HIPAA laws are in place to protect patients and healthcare employees, it’s been proven that there’s only so much that can be done in order to protect hospitals and doctors’ offices against data breaches. Hackers may have certain inclinations in mind when it comes to installing Ransomware or Malware on a medical facility’s network, and you can’t really blame them. Because a patient’s data is so sensitive, and because almost all records are now kept digitally, these hackers have a lot of leverage when it comes to getting what they want. If hospitals don’t have a way of backing up this information, or they are afraid of it getting into the wrong hands (one of the biggest concerns), they will certainly feel the pressure to pay up.

Of course, as we know, it’s not only hackers that are to blame for data breaches. According to this HIMMS Cybersecurity Survey, 20% of the respondents said the attack came from a negligent insider.

The Problem

So, what’s the deal? If healthcare industries know that they are a target, and they know that healthcare data breaches are one of the main threats we are seeing today among relevant industries, then what’s going wrong? Why can’t something change in order to put a stop to all of this?

Well, according to HealthIT Security, the problem is that there isn’t a standard cybersecurity framework that’s being utilized across the board. When these healthcare industries aren’t on the same page regarding this issue, then it makes sense that more breaches continue to occur.

How to Protect Healthcare Industries

Unfortunately, just talking about what needs to be done isn’t going to help the thousands of healthcare facilities that are experiencing data breaches this year or even this month, especially when many hospitals, insurance companies, and doctor’s offices are still each using their own software and computer systems.

At this moment, healthcare companies should be doing everything in their power to keep their own network secure. While one way to do this is, of course, by implementing a solid network management plan, the absolute best way to go about this is through hiring an outsourced CIO. This will not only help to prevent data breaches coming from the outside, but it can also help stop data breaches that happen internally. Additionally, a CIO can help implement a reliable backup and disaster recovery system to protect the patients’ information as well as protect the medical facility from risk.

 

It’s Time to Start Giving Your Data the Respect It Deserves

Many of us like to think of data as bits of information floating around in the cloud — after all, what other way is there to envision something that’s more or less invisible to the naked eye? Well, if that’s how you refer to the data in your network, then it’s likely you’re treating it as such, too. The problem with this is that data deserves more respect than it’s getting. When companies make big decisions based on what they consider a ‘single-entity of data,’ they might be missing a lot of worthy information and could end up making a costly choice because of that.

The Deal with Data

There are currently a lot of trends surrounding data, but sometimes it’s not about the data itself — it’s about how you’re managing it. Because data is so fundamental to business operations, it’s time that we start treating data as a valuable asset to the company. Whether you need to imagine data wearing a suit and tie to work every day or that it’s sitting in the conference room at a team meeting, that’s fine. But,  if you don’t, there may as well be big consequences for your company.

Unfortunately, it’s not so easy. The problem is, data is just too big. When it comes to gaining real value from interpreting data, it’s impossible to know where to begin. This is why companies are starting to look at data lakes and other solutions to help find what’s valuable, without wasting time on shuffling through data that might not serve a purpose. While data lakes might be out of the question for your business, there is a lot you can do on your own, first.

How to Make Data a True Asset

Just as you would set certain protocols and management tasks as a company leader, data shouldn’t be left out from this. Remember, data in many ways is an enterprise. Therefore, those same protocols and principles you assign to anything else in your company should also be assigned to data. Just as you would measure an employee’s performance, calculate your sales, or monitor your network’s security, you should monetize, measure, and manage your data the same way. This way, you can be sure that the information you gain from this data is truly meaningful, without any part of it being overlooked.

Apply Analytics to Data

How would you really internalize potentially imperative information at your company?

You would analyze it.

So, data needs to be analyzed, too, in the appropriate manner — just as you would apply analytics to any other aspect of your business. If you want real ROI, then it’s absolutely necessary to put data under the microscope. This can be hard when there is just a plethora of data out there, waiting to be sorted. Therefore, data needs to be evaluated while being combined with the analyses done on sales, marketing, and feedback.

If you’re not quite sure how to go about this, keep in mind that there are several lenses with which to look at data. According to James Burke, director at ISG, you can proceed this way:

  • Descriptive analytics: What happened?
  • Diagnostic analytics: Why did something happen?
  • Predictive analytics: What will happen next?
  • Prescriptive analytics: How can we make something happen?

Today, there are many resources companies can utilize to help analyze their data correctly and treat that information as an asset. When done consistently, companies will see positive results.

How Outsourcing a CIO Can Help With This

The right data can tell us about our business. If your company is eager to find strategies to grow, then it’s worth looking at that data to see if it holds any clues. Likewise, companies don’t want to spend money on resources they don’t need, especially if that budget is needed elsewhere. When treated as an asset, data can be very valuable in terms of understanding your business because it can give companies a better visual of what’s really necessary. But, this is difficult for companies to do on their own.

The solution?

Outsourcing your CIO — a professional who knows how to do all of this. They know what to look for, how to analyze it, and how to apply it to future decisions. They know what to take from a large amount of data, putting it under the microscope to find what’s valuable. They know what they are doing and how to help you. Investing in a CIO, then, will save your company a lot of time and money in the long run.

Pay Attention To These Top 5 Security Concerns for 2018

Cybersecurity is hands down becoming one of the most talked about issues today. Companies nowadays have to put their security before anything else they do, and this can be a costly venture if not done correctly. While one aspect of managing security involves hiring an unbiased third party to take care of it, it’s also important to know what you could be doing for yourself and your company to keep everything that matters secure. Each year, the cybersecurity conversation is constantly changing, though, due to the ever-increasing sophistication of data breaches that we typically see.

These are the security issues you want to pay the most attention to as 2017 comes to an end:

1) Machine Learning

It may not be Judgement Day yet, but we might be well on our way to the land of the “Terminators.” Machine learning is happening fast, and next year we will have technology that doesn’t need to be programmed to learn a new task. Sound scary? Well, the implications machine learning can have for people with bad intentions looks good for them, and very bad for everyone else. Hackers out there with such intentions can use machine learning to their advantage.

2) Digital Baggage

Remember all those Facebook photos you posted back in college? Okay, maybe you didn’t grow up during the Facebook age, but if you have children now that are online, it’s something you need to know. That’s because 2018 will be a year where we discuss “Digital Baggage” in terms of cybersecurity. These days, minors can essentially post whatever they want online, and there aren’t too many regulations in place to stop it. While some parents are very cautious with this, most are too busy to pay too much attention. Regardless, anything that you post online can have the potential to hurt you later on. Next year, companies will start looking into this when it comes to hiring new staff or getting rid of employees they already have.

3) Biometrics and Serverless Architectures

Technology is continuing to expand into realms that we have never seen before. Next year, we’re likely to see biometrics — such as face and fingerprint scanning — be incorporated into device verification. We will also start to see more serverless architectures which are apps that can be built without having to host them on a managed server.

What do these two things have in common? Well, whether it’s the ease of use, low-cost, or user-friendly interfaces, biometrics and serverless architectures are pretty attractive. However, while they seem to be some of the most secure methods out there, there are still some inconsistencies and questions being raised. For instance, how secure really is a face scan? And, aren’t serverless apps immune to DoS attacks?

4) Wireless Breaches

We are in an era now where everything is connected. You may have heard it described as the ‘Internet of Things.’ Pretty soon, things like smart homes will be the norm. We will be connected in every aspect of our lives, on every device possible. As we already know, Wi-Fi isn’t always as secure as we want it to be, and the more connected we become, the more we need to pay attention to our security on each of those devices.

5) A Closer Eye on Companies

It seems that no matter how many times big companies make headlines for data breaches, we still continue to see this happening in the news over and over again. Because consumers rarely read privacy regulations (often checking off the “agree to terms” box to get to the next step), companies tend to cut corners and take advantage of this in order to save themselves money. At the same time, companies who do experience data breaches seem to think that ignoring it or covering it up will keep customers on board. Unfortunately, after what we’ve seen with Yahoo!, Uber, and other companies, the more they’ve tried to hide it, the more they’ve made the problem worse.

Next year, you can be sure that there will be more watchful eyes upon companies when it comes to their cybersecurity. And, these watchful eyes won’t just be from auditors, but from the customers themselves. Therefore, the more you make security a priority, the better off you will be.

In 2018, anything involving data, machines, Internet, etc., will certainly have more streamlined processes. However, it’s important to keep in mind that there are two sides to everything. What’s easy in one aspect could be a nightmare in other aspects, in this case, security. Get ahead of the game and know what to look out for next year so you’re company is prepared. 

What Companies Do After Data Breaches That’s Causing More Harm

Data breaches can happen to any company. No matter what industry you work in, there’s always a threat out there. While companies can be doing a lot to stop a breach before it happens, they sometimes have to learn the hard way that they’ve made an error somewhere along the line.

But, it’s not always what companies do before a breach happens that’s a problem. Sometimes, it’s what they do afterward that results in more serious problems long-term. However, if companies can be aware of what mistakes they can make following a data breach, then they can do a better job of cleaning up the mess and getting back on their feet.

Of course, if you ignore this advice, then you could be making things much worse:

Trying to Keep it Quiet

When a breach happens, there’s no doubt that it’s embarrassing. You’re well aware of what people will say about your company, and that some customers may decide to stop buying your products and services altogether. But, it’s always important to remember that honesty is the best policy. And, in today’s world, if you fail to be honest, people will eventually find out anyway, and wonder why you didn’t come forward in the first place.

We’ve seen it in the headlines with major companies. Equifax, Target, Yahoo…all of these companies waited quite some time before reporting the breach to the news. Uber failed to say anything at all. But, often times, the public beat them to it, leaving customers asking, “Why?”

If consumers know about the breach, they have time to call their banks, change their passwords, and secure their information. Most people are also understanding that breaches happen. What they can’t understand is why the company would waste any time in helping them their consumers protect their data.

If your company experiences a data breach, inform relevant parties ASAP. If you’re still waiting for information, you can let your customers know that you will give them more details as soon as possible. Of course, having a protocol in place to deal with this is very important.

Not Giving Correct Information

Perhaps what’s worse than trying to cover up a breach is giving the wrong information about it. While you should give a press release as soon as you can, it’s never okay to jump to conclusions and then report those conclusions to consumers. Instead, you can say “We’re waiting for more information at this time,” instead of flooding the media with information that isn’t necessarily true. Many major companies have done things like this on various occasions, leading to more confusion and questions that could have been avoided.

Trying to Protect Your Reputation and Taking it Too Far

In addition to keeping a breach “hush-hush,” companies also make the mistake about fretting over their reputation too much. And, as we’ve all learned, sometimes putting in too much effort in anything has the opposite effect.

For instance, back when the Yahoo breach happened, CEO Marissa Meyer did not inform users to reset their passwords. She was too concerned that this would “annoy” customers when instead, it could have protected them. Additionally, when the Equifax breach occurred, the company profited off of consumers by giving them the opportunity to freeze their report for a price. Before that, they told consumers that they’d get a year of free credit score reports if they waived their right to sue the company.

If you experience a breach, there are always going to be consumers who have something negative to say about it. But, as long as you follow protocol, the consumers that are loyal to you will appreciate your cooperation and not let the breach ruin the relationship they have with you.

 Not Owning Up to Your Role in Causing the Breach

Although we know a breach can happen to anyone, the truth of the matter is that most companies can prevent a breach – or, at least minimize the magnitude of that breach – if they really wanted to. It’s also important to recognize that many breaches are a result of human error within the company and not external threats. Company leaders who fail to come clean and give a public apology for the breach, regardless of whether or not they actually had a role in the matter, are causing more damage long-term.

So, bite your tongue, apologize, and make sure whoever or whatever is responsible for the breach is held accountable, only after you’ve said your “sorry.”

If you can avoid these mistakes after a breach occurs, you will be better off.

Are You Keeping Your Information Secure this Holiday Season?

With Black Friday and Cyber Monday around the corner, as well as a whole month of holiday shopping, people are using their debit cards, credit cards, and other accounts — like Paypal — to make purchases. But, because of all the transactions being made via the Internet, companies need to work hard to make sure they’re keeping themselves and their customers secure. Hackers will be looking for every opportunity possible to get their hands on some valuable information. Remember, a data breach of any kind can cause you or your company long-term problems.

Do your best to prepare yourself and your company against these threats this holiday season.

Here’s how:

Make Sure Compliance Practices are Up to Date

The best way to make sure you protect yourself this season is by making sure your compliance practices are up to date. If you’re keeping up with compliance laws, then you’re significantly lowering your risk of experiencing a data breach. Speak with your managed service provider to ask them if you’re doing everything you’re supposed to be doing, and if there are any new threats you need to be aware of.

Stay Away from Public WiFi Networks

It’s a no-brainer that shopping online while you’re in a public place, connected to a public Wi-Fi network, can seriously put you at risk. This holiday, whether your company is buying from suppliers online, or you’re shopping online for friends and family, don’t make the mistake of shopping at a new place. Shop from the safety of your secured home or office network, so you don’t risk prying eyes stealing sensitive data.

Add Additional Security

Whenever there is the increased risk of threat, it doesn’t hurt to add additional security to combat that. This might be a good time to change some passwords, avoid logging in from other devices, and checking on who has access to what. Keep a sharp eye and make sure there’s no funny or phishy” business going on.

Don’t Trust Strange Links or URLs

If you’re browsing online and add things to your various online shopping carts, you can anticipate a lot of e-mails reminding you to complete your purchase. Hackers will use this as a way of getting into your network. What might seem like an obvious link leading back to your shopping cart, could be Malware waiting to be easily installed on your device.

Stay Up to Date on Your Bank Statement

Last but not least, this time a year is a good time to constantly check on your banking activity. With all the purchases being made, a hacker can use your credit card information to make small purchases without you even noticing. It goes without saying that you should pay attention to what you buy, and if you work at a company, what purchases are being made. This way, if you notice any inconsistencies, you’ll be able to address them quickly

How Secure is Password Managing Software Like Dashlane?

Any individual or company who wants to follow best security practices understands how important it is to make sure any passwords used are strong and hard to break. In addition to that, people try to utilize two-factor authentication whenever possible and are starting to stray away from sites that don’t offer this. However, as people are taking their passwords more and more seriously, it’s getting more difficult to remember all those passwords.

Password managing software, like Dashlane, has helped to find a solution to the “forgot my password” problem. At first, many people are skeptical about using it, and we don’t blame them. With all your passwords stored in one location, doesn’t that make it riskier?

If you’re considering using a password managing software, it’s good to know what you’re getting yourself into. So, here are some basic facts and how we feel you should move forward.

How Do Password Managers Work?

Websites like Dashlane have a variety of different features that keep it secure. First of all, your master password doesn’t get stored on the servers. That master password is the only key to your closet of passwords. Beyond that, each individual password you have on there is encrypted, so if a hacker really wanted to know your information, they’d have to decode each one separately – and that would take a really long time. Therefore, there’s no possible way for all of the passwords you have stored to be decoded – at least, not all at once.

Additionally, companies like Dashlane use some of the most reliable servers, such as AWS, which scatters data in a lot of different places. This means that if you were to visualize where your passwords are sitting in cyberspace, they aren’t in a room that’s labeled “John’s Passwords.” They are split up with other users’ information, too.

Lastly, these companies are generally working with cybersecurity providers on a constant basis so that security is consistently being audited.

How Can I Be Absolutely Sure My Master Password is Safe?

Unlike other websites, your master password for a site like Dashlane is unique. As mentioned before, it’s not stored on their servers. There are no password hints given, and once you create a master password, it can’t be reset if you forget it. This is to keep tricky hackers out there from easily resetting your password so they can then have access to everything else. Of course, these password managers also ask you to create a very secure password using a combination of letters, numbers, symbols, etc. – and, generally, won’t approve your account until the password is strong enough.

Is it Worth It?

There are a lot of proactive individuals and companies needing to utilize password managing software but are worried that the consequences of a hack are much worse than if just one password happened to be revealed. That being said, it seems as though that these managers are doing everything in their power to keep your information as secure as possible.

Does that mean it could still get hacked? Well, these days, it’s not impossible. But, it seems very, very unlikely.

If you’re still hesitant, one of the best ways to keep your passwords safe is the old – fashioned way; in a notebook, locked in a safe. Still, it’s also important to practice safe password protocol, and if you do use a notebook, make sure absolutely nobody untrustworthy has access to it!

There’s no clear answer about how secure password managing software is, so, at the end of the day, it’s up to your discretion. And, best security practices are constantly changing, so just make sure you stay up to date.