Category Archives for Managed Services

Six Major IT Functions You Cannot Do Without and Must Perform At Optimal Level

Your body is amazing.

It is comprised of six major systems in which all functions interact with each other. Not one survives without the other. Remove one from your body? You die.

(Just in case you were wondering: Skeletal, Muscular, Nervous, Digestive, Respiratory and Circulatory).

IT management also consists of six major functions that interact with each other. Failure to develop and maintain health in these, and you invite serious dysfunction; weak in one weakens all.

Communication

How does your IT leader communicate with peers and executives?

How do you coordinate when IT cannot make a decision alone?

How does IT partner with senior managers in strategic development and complementary focal points?

How does the Board understand IT issues and what must they know to make appropriate decisions?

People

How do you ensure that you hire, develop and retain the best talent?

How do you manage the gap of knowledge between managers and tech specialists?

How do you navigate leadership of highly smart and variously motivated employees?

How do you know what your talented people can or cannot do?

Cost and Accounting

How do you get the right people in decisions and safeguard what is in the interest of the company and not just a particular department?

What determines value for IT and where to invest for maximum return?

How do you know what projects to invest in and what determines there priority?

Project

When do you know to expand the scope of a project or not?

How will you budget while allowing for uncertainty in project time and cost?

What budget considerations do you make for the need to learn during the course of a project?

What is the chain of communication for when problems arise?

Partner and Services

What is essential in the agreements you structure with outside partners and vendors?

What is the selection process?

How do you know what must stay within the company’s walls and what need not be?

Who will we use for outside eyes?

Infrastructure

How much do you invest in maintenance versus new capabilities, and how do you know when new is needed?

What is your Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Plan?

How much will you invest in redundancy?

How do you identify emerging threats and opportunities?

How does emerging technology integrate into your strategic plans?

In coming weeks, I will address each of these. But a major takeaway for today is, every company needs to bring in outside eyes to evaluate each of these functions: We don’t ignore our body’s systems, and we don’t ignore our company’s IT systems. The last thing you want is an IT emergency that could have been avoided.

5 Reasons to Hire a CIO Before Hiring an IT Team

Whether you’re starting a business from scratch or finally making investments to grow your business, one thing you’re probably thinking about is hiring people to help. Any time you can bring people on board to help you with business tasks, it’s evident that you’re thinking about long-term strategies, and that’s great. But, before you start doing what it seems like everyone else is doing to be successful (in this case, hiring an IT team to help with tasks you don’t know how to do), hold off for just a second. While there’s no doubt that an IT team is instrumental in any company these days, it’s actually much more important to hire a CIO before anything else.

Here’s why:

1) You Should Know What Kind of Talent to Look For

It may seem as though all IT experts can be thrown in the same category. They all went to school for computer engineering, they are all smart in their own way, and most importantly, they seem to know a lot more about information technology than you do. But, the thing is, many business leaders don’t know what they don’t know when it comes to this stuff.

Any IT person possesses a unique skill asset which can either make them a great fit for your company or not at all. A CIO can determine what talent is ideal for your company, so you know what kind of skills and abilities you’re looking for in a person, before making any decisions.

2) You Don’t Want to Spend Money Unnecessarily

Do you need one IT person, or do you need a team? Or, can the jobs you need to be taken care of right now be handled by the CIO? Before you start to spend money on resources that you don’t currently need, let your CIO determine exactly what it is and who it is you should be investing your hard-earned money in.

3) Don’t Leave Out the Need for External Vendors

It’s not just an in-house IT team that needs proper vetting before being hired. It’s also – if not, more – the external vendors you might be working with. There’s a whole process of identity management and onboarding and offboarding that needs to happen in order to protect a company from an unintentional (or sometimes, intentional) data breach of any kind. A CIO can determine what strategies should be in place prior to hiring external vendors.

4) Perhaps Your Network Needs a Change

Just as a CIO would help you hire an IT expert that has the appropriate skill set for your network, they can also determine if you’re using the right technology, software, cloud infrastructure, etc. Before making any employment decisions, it’s a good idea to make sure you don’t need to change anything about your network, first. After all, it would be frustrating for an IT person to get familiar with your system, just to have to learn something else.

5) You Need an Unbiased Assessment Before Deploying Resources

Hiring a CIO before hiring an IT team is like going to your general practitioner before seeing a specialist. While it might seem that going to a specialist straight away would make sense time-wise and financially, there may not be anything you need to worry about in the first place. This can be true of your company, too. Don’t jump to any conclusions and don’t spend money on resources you may not need, whether that be an IT person or a certain piece of technology. Instead, hire a CIO and have them assess your network before hiring or deploying any resources.

But, What If I Already Have an IT Team?

If you’ve already hired an IT team, don’t worry. You don’t need to let anybody go. But, you can and should still hire a CIO to help serve as the liaison between you as the company leader and your IT squad. It’s never too late to have an unbiased expert hop on board and take a look at everything. This way, there can be a system of checks and balances to ensure your business is being run as efficiently as possible, while every team member truly feels as though his or her role is vital in the success of the company.

That being said, if possible, reaching out to a knowledgeable CIO should be the first step, not the last. A CIO can help manage your network in a way that nobody else can. And, not just in terms of hiring decisions, but security, backup, disaster recovery, and everything in between.

Why Healthcare Industries Are Seeing More Data Breaches

No company is immune to a data breach. These days, no matter what industry a company falls under, there is always the risk of something happening. If companies aren’t taking the proper measures to manage their networks, a data breach can really set a company back, if not taking it off the market completely. Because of this, more and more companies have realized the importance of investing in an outsourced CIO to help prevent problems from occurring. Why, is it then, that we are seeing continuous data breaches in the healthcare industry, and why are the problems not being solved?

Well, it’s not so simple, and there may be several reasons as to why the healthcare industry is experiencing more data breaches than ever before.

Data Breach Statistics

In order to really understand how data breaches are impacting the healthcare industry, one would need to look at the actual numbers. According to the annual HIMMS Cybersecurity Survey, 75% of the 239 healthcare respondents surveyed reported that their organization experienced a “significant security incident in the past 12 months.” What’s interesting is that 96% of those respondents said that the organizations were able to identify the threat actor. But, as more than half of these respondents reported that their organization has a clearly defined budget that is allocated to cybersecurity and are seemingly on top of their network, it makes people wonder why these data breaches are continuing to happen at such high rates.

Healthcare Industry as a Target

Despite the fact HIPAA laws are in place to protect patients and healthcare employees, it’s been proven that there’s only so much that can be done in order to protect hospitals and doctors’ offices against data breaches. Hackers may have certain inclinations in mind when it comes to installing Ransomware or Malware on a medical facility’s network, and you can’t really blame them. Because a patient’s data is so sensitive, and because almost all records are now kept digitally, these hackers have a lot of leverage when it comes to getting what they want. If hospitals don’t have a way of backing up this information, or they are afraid of it getting into the wrong hands (one of the biggest concerns), they will certainly feel the pressure to pay up.

Of course, as we know, it’s not only hackers that are to blame for data breaches. According to this HIMMS Cybersecurity Survey, 20% of the respondents said the attack came from a negligent insider.

The Problem

So, what’s the deal? If healthcare industries know that they are a target, and they know that healthcare data breaches are one of the main threats we are seeing today among relevant industries, then what’s going wrong? Why can’t something change in order to put a stop to all of this?

Well, according to HealthIT Security, the problem is that there isn’t a standard cybersecurity framework that’s being utilized across the board. When these healthcare industries aren’t on the same page regarding this issue, then it makes sense that more breaches continue to occur.

How to Protect Healthcare Industries

Unfortunately, just talking about what needs to be done isn’t going to help the thousands of healthcare facilities that are experiencing data breaches this year or even this month, especially when many hospitals, insurance companies, and doctor’s offices are still each using their own software and computer systems.

At this moment, healthcare companies should be doing everything in their power to keep their own network secure. While one way to do this is, of course, by implementing a solid network management plan, the absolute best way to go about this is through hiring an outsourced CIO. This will not only help to prevent data breaches coming from the outside, but it can also help stop data breaches that happen internally. Additionally, a CIO can help implement a reliable backup and disaster recovery system to protect the patients’ information as well as protect the medical facility from risk.

Should There Be an IT Hierarchy in Companies?

When it comes to managing a company’s network, data issues, or IT concerns, there are a lot of people that work together to make sure everything runs smoothly. One task may finally be complete only after various members from different departments come together. People from HR, IT, as well as C-level leaders may all be assigned various roles in order to implement security standards, backup protocol, or onboard contractors.

But, despite the fact that security and network maintenance is a team effort, who has the ultimate say in what goes on? Who is in charge – the one running the show to make sure everyone else does their job? There’s a lot of conversation surrounding this idea that IT shouldn’t be situated in a hierarchy model. However, others disagree and believe that in order for things to really go well, someone needs to take the lead.

The best option?

Let’s find out.

When Roles Get Confusing

Human resources hires a CIO. A CIO then advises the IT team on what needs to be done in order to create a disaster recovery program or help mitigate security risks. IT understands the task at hand and works with the administration on a devising a new budget regarding the systems they’ll need to implement. HR then tells IT that new, outside contractors are being hired, and therefore, those security protocols are absolutely necessary and need to be implemented sooner than later. But, the CIO and other C-level leaders can’t seem to be convinced about whether or not the budget has room for what the others are proposing.

Does something like this sound familiar?

According to a study conducted by Nintex titled the Definitive Guide to America’s Most Broken Processes, it was found that 62% of respondents said their company has broken processes when it comes to IT. While it might seem like the office has a system to cope with all these roles, responsibilities, and requests, it can be a bit convoluted. And, especially when each role is so different, it’s difficult to determine who should really be answering to whom. Does IT work under HR when they can control HR’s access to the system? Then, does the CHRO answer to the CIO, or does the CIO answer to the CHRO depending on the situation? Experts believe these roles should be interchangeable in order to avoid conflict and miscommunication in business.

But, that still leaves the role of “leader” unfulfilled, which can be hard when a company’s decision on an important matter cannot be agreed upon. Someone, eventually, must have the final say.

The Problems with Teamwork

Let’s say the whole “teamwork” thing is working well for everyone involved. Then, one day, a data breach occurs, or the network shuts down. One of the biggest causes of something like this, specifically the data breach, is human error. If this happens, the blame needs to put somewhere, even if the company leaders will still need to take responsibility for the entire breach.

Going with the idea that “two heads are better than one”, there are certainly a lot of things a team can accomplish versus a single person when it comes to mitigating risks across the company. That being said, there is also an equal number of things that can go wrong- more things that aren’t being handled appropriately, or miscommunications that can occur – when there isn’t a hierarchy in place to check for errors internally.

Put an Outsourced CIO in Charge

Many companies still hire in-house CIOs, which may be good for the moment, but may not make a difference if there’s a crisis. In any situation where it’s difficult to determine who is in charge, it’s necessary that companies consider hiring an outsourced CIO to make appropriate calls in the best interest of the company, and without employees being personally invested in what’s going on.

An outsourced CIO can easily determine what’s at risk for the company and can clear those up through a process in which everyone works together – a process in which they oversee everything, and assign roles to those who can handle it. They can check for consistent gaps in the system, make sure employees are given the appropriate access to the network based on their position at the company, and work with other C-Level leaders to determine whether or not things like a BYOD policy are safe for everyone involved.

Remember, an outsourced CIO doesn’t have any emotional investment in the company. They are completely unbiased and can, therefore, make decisions that other team members may not be in a position to make themselves or don’t feel comfortable making. While it’s understandable that working as a team can be effective, there are times when something just calls for a professional leader’s decision on the matter.

So, for those that say that there shouldn’t be a hierarchy in IT, maybe they should reconsider before jumping to any conclusions.

Are You Confident Enough in Your Organization’s Ability to Mitigate Risks?

Cybersecurity is a huge concern for all businesses. Companies understand that they need to prioritize their security methods in order to ensure they don’t experience major losses due to a potential data breach. Despite major headlines that have repeatedly demonstrated the impact these hacks have on companies, recent studies have found that people are still not as prepared as they need to be in order to mitigate such risks. While these companies may be confident saying that they believe in their organization’s ability to manage cybersecurity internally, according to the data, that doesn’t seem to be working (or entirely true).

Even companies who have the best IT teams and equipment understand the need for an outsourced CIO to handle cybersecurity, as well as other managed services.

Here’s why:

Many Risks are Internal

One reason that companies are unable to mitigate all the risks is because they are simply looking in all the wrong places. Every time we learn of another major breach, it doesn’t take long to discover that it happened due to something internal. Perhaps a firewall wasn’t updated, an employee used their personal unsecured device to access work, or the network infrastructure the company is using isn’t being maintained properly, leaving gaps all over. Companies don’t want to admit that they are a risk to themselves. And, even if a breach came from elsewhere, the fact that a hacker could get in is usually the company’s fault.

To fix this, an outsourced CIO can come in, take a look at your systems from an outsider’s point of view, and do what they need to do to patch it up.

Everybody Needs to be Vetted Before Being Onboarded

If your company hires contractors, partners, or interns to work with you, they will likely be given access to the company’s network. And, the more often you’re onboarding “strangers,” the easier it is for one of these people to let in a breach. Typically, it’s unintentional, but there are times where perhaps an employee who was recently let go seeks to take some kind of revenge on the business.

However, with the right network infrastructure (these days, it’s the cloud), security is placed on identities themselves, provided for new or temporary employees. When this is set-up by a managed service provider, HR and IT follows the process and works together with the outsourced CIO to prevent any leaks from occurring. Of course, proper vetting of the individual is necessary before providing them with company access as well.

Because Your Day to Day Job Doesn’t Involve Monitoring Security Risks

In general, 70% of respondents off the Marsh-Microsoft Worldwide Cyber Perception Survey reported that their IT departments are in charge of making important decisions about the company’s network. A lot of these decisions naturally have to do with the network’s security overall. As a business leader, this definitely isn’t your department, so you’re counting on the individuals over in IT to make the right choices. But, believe it or not, IT shouldn’t really have that kind of say, either. Their job isn’t just calling the shots on security measures.

While cybersecurity is certainly a task that involves a little work from everyone in the company, it takes a little more expertise than that. An outsourced CIO can help assign appropriate roles to each employee to make sure everyone is doing their part. Additionally, companies who have moved over to a cloud infrastructure are likely to face fewer risks, too, as cloud technology manages many risks on its own.

The Costs Alone Aren’t Worth the Risk

According to Business Insurance’s breakdown of the survey, 40% of respondents who reported a data breach in the last 12 months said that the worst-case scenario lost them $50 million or more. Out of that number, only 19% revealed “they are highly confident in their organizations’ ability to mitigate and respond to a cyber attack.” 

With that much money at stake, it doesn’t really seem worth it to take your chances. As a C-level leader, if you’re not totally comfortable in your company’s ability to mitigate such risks, then it’s time to find someone you can trust who can.

Concerned About Carillion? Why Your Small Business is Safe

In January 2018, U.K.’s second-largest outsourcing construction company, Carillion, collapsed, leaving many people confused and others significantly out of money. When a company this large has to completely go into liquidation, projects simply cease to continue, and a lot of questions have since been raised. While the media has been discussing the issue of private contracts being combined with public services, companies who outsource services are also concerned, but for different reasons. This is making the general public a little uneasy when it comes to the idea of outsourcing overall.

However, there are lessons to be learned from a company like Carillion. And, especially if you’re a small business, you really don’t need to worry. Just check on these:

Communication is Key

In any business, bad communication can lead to even worse problems. In order to make sure things don’t go wrong, having open communication is imperative. Unfortunately, with Carillion, communication may not have always been as clear as it could have been, and when things started to going downhill, a rescue plan was too late to execute. Of course, this can be inevitable when you’re running such a big operation.

Luckily, as a small business leader, communication between you, your CIO, and your IT team is not only easy, but it’s kind of the whole point of outsourcing to begin with. An unbiased CIO allows there to be a smooth conversation among all parties, ensuring that no one is left out of the loop, and instructions are given to the right people. It also helps to make sure businesses stay compliant, as they should be advised their own role in compliance along with the CIO and IT.

Always Pay Attentions to Contracts and SLAs

If your biggest worry about hiring an outsourced CIO is the legitimacy of the contracts and service level agreements, that’s a valid concern. A contract that’s not treated seriously or that doesn’t clearly outline what it will encompass, can potentially cause a lot of damage. Additionally, contracts should also be flexible; as a client, it’s nice to have the freedom to go back in and make changes as needed — changes that won’t put anyone at a disadvantage. Carillion didn’t really have this option, as they mainly worked with long-term contracts.

An SLA is the single most important thing you can consider before moving forward with outsourcing your CIO. But, as a small business with very specific needs, it’s likely you’ll be in good hands no matter what.

How Busy is Your CIO?

In the case of Carillion, they were managing way too many contracts at once — many of which didn’t pan out. When you’re taking on contracts to build everything from schools to roads to hospitals for the government, it can get a bit too overwhelming to keep everything in order. Any outsourced CIO may be able to relate to this to some degree. After all, a CIO who wants to provide the best support for their clients needs to be available on a regular basis, and know what to do and how to do it.

It goes without saying that if the CIO you’re looking to hire seems too busy with other clients, then a similar situation to Carillion — though, on a smaller scale — may happen. Would it affect you? Not necessarily. But, it’s still important to work with someone who isn’t stretching him or herself too thin.

Outsourcing Your CIO is Still a Great Idea

Though the Carillion situation might be a bit scary when it comes to the thought of outsourcing, unfortunately, they had factors going against them that won’t be the case for small businesses. One of the reasons Carillion had a downfall was because, at the end of the day, they took on more than they could handle. This was one of the rare times where we see the potential negative side of outsourcing. That being said, even though potential customers may have some reservations, the benefits certainly outweigh those concerns by a long shot.

For businesses who don’t have the time to handle their technology needs, outsourcing to an expert CIO can make a world of difference. They do what they need to do to make sure your network runs smoothly, letting you take care of business. Of course, a good CIO will work with your IT team while still keeping you in the loop. Overall, outsourcing your CIO saves you time, money, and the stress.

Still worried? Hopefully, this made you feel a bit better about your outsourcing plan.

It’s Time to Start Giving Your Data the Respect It Deserves

Many of us like to think of data as bits of information floating around in the cloud — after all, what other way is there to envision something that’s more or less invisible to the naked eye? Well, if that’s how you refer to the data in your network, then it’s likely you’re treating it as such, too. The problem with this is that data deserves more respect than it’s getting. When companies make big decisions based on what they consider a ‘single-entity of data,’ they might be missing a lot of worthy information and could end up making a costly choice because of that.

The Deal with Data

There are currently a lot of trends surrounding data, but sometimes it’s not about the data itself — it’s about how you’re managing it. Because data is so fundamental to business operations, it’s time that we start treating data as a valuable asset to the company. Whether you need to imagine data wearing a suit and tie to work every day or that it’s sitting in the conference room at a team meeting, that’s fine. But,  if you don’t, there may as well be big consequences for your company.

Unfortunately, it’s not so easy. The problem is, data is just too big. When it comes to gaining real value from interpreting data, it’s impossible to know where to begin. This is why companies are starting to look at data lakes and other solutions to help find what’s valuable, without wasting time on shuffling through data that might not serve a purpose. While data lakes might be out of the question for your business, there is a lot you can do on your own, first.

How to Make Data a True Asset

Just as you would set certain protocols and management tasks as a company leader, data shouldn’t be left out from this. Remember, data in many ways is an enterprise. Therefore, those same protocols and principles you assign to anything else in your company should also be assigned to data. Just as you would measure an employee’s performance, calculate your sales, or monitor your network’s security, you should monetize, measure, and manage your data the same way. This way, you can be sure that the information you gain from this data is truly meaningful, without any part of it being overlooked.

Apply Analytics to Data

How would you really internalize potentially imperative information at your company?

You would analyze it.

So, data needs to be analyzed, too, in the appropriate manner — just as you would apply analytics to any other aspect of your business. If you want real ROI, then it’s absolutely necessary to put data under the microscope. This can be hard when there is just a plethora of data out there, waiting to be sorted. Therefore, data needs to be evaluated while being combined with the analyses done on sales, marketing, and feedback.

If you’re not quite sure how to go about this, keep in mind that there are several lenses with which to look at data. According to James Burke, director at ISG, you can proceed this way:

  • Descriptive analytics: What happened?
  • Diagnostic analytics: Why did something happen?
  • Predictive analytics: What will happen next?
  • Prescriptive analytics: How can we make something happen?

Today, there are many resources companies can utilize to help analyze their data correctly and treat that information as an asset. When done consistently, companies will see positive results.

How Outsourcing a CIO Can Help With This

The right data can tell us about our business. If your company is eager to find strategies to grow, then it’s worth looking at that data to see if it holds any clues. Likewise, companies don’t want to spend money on resources they don’t need, especially if that budget is needed elsewhere. When treated as an asset, data can be very valuable in terms of understanding your business because it can give companies a better visual of what’s really necessary. But, this is difficult for companies to do on their own.

The solution?

Outsourcing your CIO — a professional who knows how to do all of this. They know what to look for, how to analyze it, and how to apply it to future decisions. They know what to take from a large amount of data, putting it under the microscope to find what’s valuable. They know what they are doing and how to help you. Investing in a CIO, then, will save your company a lot of time and money in the long run.

Cyber Security Compliance is Nothing Without Measurement

These days, companies need to do whatever they can to make sure their business is cyber security compliant. Being compliant means your company is following certain practices to protect your customers, your network, and most importantly, yourself.

A CIO’s main responsibility is to implement the right cyber security measures for your company. But, another part of their job is guiding you to make the right decisions for your company thereafter. So, here’s how we can all do a better job of taking cyber security just another step further:

Compliance is Important, But It’s Not the Only Factor

One of the main reasons businesses invest in the services of a CIO to begin with is because it’s imperative that they are cyber security compliant. However, many CIOs are only keeping this in mind when setting up the right security infrastructure, and unfortunately, that’s not going to help a business in the long run. All security decisions need to be made with the business mindset, because if the actual risk can’t be understood or evaluated from a business point of view, why would any company leader take interest?

Businesses Should Be Involved in Making Cyber Security Decisions from the Start

Although your CIO is the primary decision maker when it comes to cyber security, it’s likely that they are working with many businesses at once. The needs of your business may be very different from the needs of another, and you want to be absolutely sure that your needs are constantly being kept in mind. Therefore, the best way to go about this is by being involved in cyber security decisions from the start. Be proactive in keeping the conversation open and make sure you’re present when those big decisions are being made. Your CIO is allowed to guide you in making these decisions and they should. After all, one of the reasons you’re hiring them in the first place is because you’re not quite equipped to do these things on your own.

There Should Always Be Consistent Measurement and Evaluation by Businesses

Once a decision has been made, it’s important to recognize that it won’t be the last. Cyber security is an ongoing process, and it’s both your job and the CIO’s job to stay involved at all times. And, once a decision is implemented, the impact of that decision should be consistently monitored, measured, and evaluated for future purpose. This is really to say, can you be certain that your cyber security system has worked, or is it time for a new solution?

Make Sure Your CISO Has a Good Reporting Record

It goes without saying that the Chief Information Securiry Officer (CISO) that your company is working with should have a great track record. The IFS, or Information Security Forum, has reported that many of these CIOs aren’t doing their job when it comes to reporting their findings of KPIs (Key Peformance Indicators) and KRIs (Key Risk Indicators) to their clients. This goes back to a previous point: that decisions need to be made from a business — your business’ — point of view. Of all the things to consider when hiring a CIO, this is a question you don’t want to leave out.

There are many steps to making sure your business is paying the utmost attention to its security situation. Is your CIO helping you be part of the process?

The Role a CIO Can Play for Your Company and Why You Should Hire One Now

Technology has taken over the business world. Ever since we’ve become more reliant on technology, we’ve been seeing new jobs added to companies to help maintain it all. And, when it comes to that technology, those who will be managing it on your company’s behalf need to have the appropriate skills and expertise to do their job correctly.

You may already have an IT team, or maybe even a CTO. But, you as the CEO need to make sure the right decisions are being made for your company at all times (and at all costs). So, isn’t it about time to outsource a chief information officer?

Why You Need a CIO

While all roles in a company are unique and important, a CIO does a number of tasks that bridge all those roles together. Ultimately, the CIO is responsible for making sure technology is properly integrated throughout the company so that operations can run smoothly. He or she has the final say on how technology is managed so that the business can keep moving forward without any hold ups.

Why Outsourcing is Important

One of the biggest questions that comes up when a company integrates technology into their everyday tasks is the issue of cyber security. Though there are many ways in which a system could potentially be hacked from outside intruders, human error is still one of the main causes of breaches that we commonly see today. Certain protocols need to be followed in order to guarantee a network’s safety. To eliminate any risks of vulnerability or conflicts among high-level decision makers, a CEO should consider outsourcing their CIO. This way, any decisions that are made are unbiased and are therefore solely for the best interest of the company.

Also, don’t forget that one of the perks of hiring any type of managed service means that you have more time to run your business. Any worries you may have will now be dealt with by that service provider.

When is the Best Time To Hire a CIO? 

Most company leaders may think it’s best to wait until a company reaches a certain level before hiring a CIO. Perhaps when a certain number of sales have been made or a certain number of followers has been reached. But, it may be that it’s time to get one sooner than later if you’re noticing some inconsistencies at your company. This could involve anything from repetitive inefficiency, seeing your network has become vulnerable to attacks, disagreements among executives, or too many tasks being handled by a small staff. Whether it’s one of these reasons, a combination of these reasons, or you just feel the need to extend such an important role to someone else, then it might be time to hire a CIO.

Does Your Cyber Security Consultant Have the Right Expertise?

When it comes to cyber security, there are a lot of things one needs to know. Ultimately, business leaders choose to invest in the help of a cyber security consultant in order to make sure their network is properly managed by an expert. But, even if your consultant claims to be an ‘expert’ in cyber security, you need to ask yourself, “Do they have the right expertise?”  Often times, it’s not about what this professional has on their list of credentials; it’s about what they don’t have. And, what they don’t have could prove to be very bad news for your security situation.

What’s Their Background When It Comes to Internet Technology?

When you look for your cyber security consultant, it might be overwhelming to see everything they have to offer you. Just like when you buy a new TV or look through a brochure, you see all the beautiful advertising. If it’s done nicely, you would never really ask yourself, “Well, what does this not have?” or “What is it missing?”

Most cyber security professionals will have an IT background, which seems like that should be a given. However, an IT background isn’t all you should be looking for. After all, if that’s all they have, then why not just consult your IT department? Surely, they have all it takes to clean up a security problem, right?

Wrong. Most business leaders know that their IT team has other responsibilities, and not quite the right experience when it comes to specifically handling security concerns. This is why CEOs seek the help of a professional cyber security consultant in the first place.

So, what is it you want to be looking for in your cyber security professional?

Clearly Defined Software Development Expertise

While an IT background is certainly necessary, you want to make sure the consultant you’re looking into working with actually has a software development background.

The biggest reason for this is because hackers generally do their work by using scripts as their main tool to cause damage on the networks of unsuspecting targets. To even recognize something like this, a cyber security professional would have to have experience in software development. But, in addition to being able to recognize this kind of hack, you also want someone who could make sure YOUR software is protected, to begin with. They know exactly what to look out for and are read up all the different types of breaches that exist.

A person with solely IT experience probably won’t be able to see this as well as someone with a software development background.

Generally, although most cyber security consultants with software development experience also have a good IT foundation, those with solid IT experience can’t really say the same for themselves. Again, it’s not about what your potential cyber security has; it’s about what they’re perhaps lacking and how that could impact the quality of their service to you.

The Bottom Line

An avid cyber security approach is important for financial companies that collect the information of their clients or have their own data to store and protect. While there are a lot of great consultants and managed services out there, take your time choosing the one that’s best for your company. And, do yourself a favor and make sure they have experience in both software development and IT. Otherwise, you aren’t really getting what you’re paying for.

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