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Category Archives for Bring Your Own Device (BYOD)

Thanks to Samsung, It’s Time to Amp Up Your Mobile Device Security

Over the last few months, Samsung has made the news for their Galaxy Note 7, which has had its batteries exploding, causing danger for users. The problem has gotten so bad that you can now get into serious trouble for bringing one onto an airplane. Though, the recent round of total recalls on all devices should help prevent that from happening.

Besides the fact that a phone exploding in your pocket or under your pillow can be a serious physical risk to a person, it also presents a huge security risk. If you were one of the one million users who had to send their phone back, then you must know Samsung now has a ton of phones with sensitive information on it. One of them could be yours.

So, Samsung may care less about your information. But, this whole situation is a clear representation of the security risks mobile devices can present if not handled correctly. All it takes is one bad person to get their hands on a device to ruin your identity or your company. Whether you owned a Galaxy Note 7 or not, you might want to give more attention to your own company’s mobile security situation.

And, you can do it in less time than a phone blows up. Here’s how.

Add Mobile Devices to Your Current Security Plan

If you already have a current security plan managed by a service provider, you don’t need to take out a new one for your mobile devices. It’s easy to call up whoever is helping you run your network and ask them to add on security for any devices that are or will be connected. There’s no sense making things more difficult for yourself and your budget when you can keep everything simple.

Make Sure Your IT Team is Well-Prepared

If you rely on your IT team or an IT person to manage your security, then there are some things you need to understand. First of all, it’s time to consider outsourcing to a managed service provider, because then you can be sure your bases are covered. We live in a world where technology is rapidly changing and therefore mobile device security must be a priority. Unfortunately, not all IT personnel can keep up. If you’re still using your IT person or team, then that’s fine, but make sure you’re investing in their tools and resources which would be necessary to ensure you’re protected

Re-Assess Your BYOD Policy

A BYOD policy is definitely not something you want to take away from your employees if you’ve already implemented it. We know that having a BYOD policy allows for a happier and more efficient workplace. That being said, in light of the events of Samsung, you might need to tighten up your mobile device security until things get under control. This could involve anything from keeping very close tabs on who is starting to bring in their own devices, to having a stricter procedure altogether.

Be Careful about Who Goes in and Who Goes Out

Does your company have a WiFi system that anyone can connect to? What about people who work at your company for a year, have access to everything, and then they just leave? Shouldn’t their devices be swiped of all company-related information and access before they’re gone for good? Remember, when it comes to cyber security, you can’t trust anyone. And, when mobile device usage continues to grow as such a fast rate, companies need to crack down.

Smeester & Associates can provide you with the tools and recommendations needed to make sure your company’s mobile devices aren’t putting you at risk.


Tech Stuff :: What You Need to Know About Pokemon GO

Pokemon GO is creating some major mobile security concerns.

Pokemon GO is creating some major mobile security concerns.

If you haven’t already heard, Pokémon GO has quickly become the biggest mobile game in U.S. history. However, the game’s rapid rise in popularity has also raised some major mobile security concerns. Its millions of users may not be aware of the many data vulnerabilities that lay hidden within the game and its privacy policy. Are you one of them? Here are the answers to your most pressing Pokémon GO questions.

  1. What Is Pokémon GO’s Privacy Policy?

Like most apps out there, Pokémon GO does collect data about its users. When first downloading the app, users need to sign in with a Google account and grant access for the app to use your camera, data and contacts. According to the Pokémon GO privacy policy, Niantic may also collect your username, email address, IP address, the web pages you were using before logging into the game and your entire Google account. In addition, the privacy policy gives the company wide latitude for using all of this information. Niantic can hand personally identifiable information (PII) over to law enforcement, sell it off and even share it with third parties.

This full access can be a huge security risk, and Niantic recently addressed this concern with a statement saying they are fixing the bug that allowed the app to gain full access to users’ accounts.

  1. Why Is Pokémon GO a Target for Cybercriminals?

Niantic’s gigantic database of data is full of information provided by its users, which makes it the perfect target for hackers and criminals. If the Niantic servers are hacked, the hijackers could potentially have access to all of your personally identifiable information (PII). The company has offered minimal details on how it plans to store all that data, but promises that it is taking the appropriate measures to protect the large database of PII – the type of information that hackers have been increasingly targeting.

  1. What Are Other Major Security Concerns with Pokémon GO?

The public nature of Pokémon GO has caused some unforeseen side effects and attracted other cybersecurity concerns. Many fake versions of the app have been uncovered, which contain malware that can lock your smartphone and cause more harm. Also, criminals have reportedly been able to use the geolocation feature to lure players to remote areas and rob them at gunpoint. This shows that although the new game has received an abundance of positive feedback, there are some major dangers that players aren’t aware of.

  1. What Problems Can Pokémon GO Present with the Rise of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) in the Workplace?

The vulnerability of mobile data within Pokémon GO means that there’s a greater need for managed IT security. Especially with the ongoing trend of BYOD, the likelihood of introducing unwanted cyber activity and harmful attacks via these connections is at an all-time high. If your employees are using unprotected devices when using the game, it could lead to exposing sensitive business data in the event of a hack.

  1. How Can I Stay Protected When Using Apps Like Pokémon GO?

Pokémon GO is a prime example of the various security risks that are presented with unprotected mobile devices and the growing need for managing these endpoints. By leveraging a solution like mobile device management (MDM), you can greatly reduce these risks. MDM gives you the ability to remotely wipe an individual’s data if a device is compromised. An MDM solution will also allow you to implement app management policies and put restrictions on app purchases from non-validated markets.

3 Ways to Boost Mobile Security

Mobile security is the protection of smartphones, tablets, laptops and other portable computing devices, and the networks they connect to, from threats and vulnerabilities associated with wireless computing. Mobile security is also known as wireless security.

Securing mobile devices has become increasingly important in recent years as the numbers of the devices in operation and the uses to which they are put have expanded dramatically. The problem is compounded within the enterprise as the ongoing trend toward IT consumerization is resulting in more and more employee-owned devices connecting to the corporate network.

Following are three ways to make sure your network is secure from mobile threats:

  1. Set a pin or passcode.

This is your first line of defense. If someone wants to access your device, they will first need to break this code. This is not an easy task, and can operate as a deterrent against theft. Some device manufacturers have an option to automatically wipe your device after a few unsuccessful attempts at your passcode or pin; so, even if your phone is stolen, your information cannot be accessed. For this reason, you should look for MSPs that offer mobile device management (MDM) in their portfolio of services.

  1. Remote locate and wipe tools.

There are thousands of applications out there, and many involve more than just crushing candy or shooting birds at pigs. Certain software can help you locate your lost or stolen device through its GPS. Apple offers a service like this for their mobile devices aptly named Find my iPhone. For Android users, the Android Device Manager offers these services. Windows Mobile users also have this option from the Windows Phone website. Similarly, many third party applications are available in each of the app stores.

  1. Keep your device clean.

Utilizing an Antivirus and Malware scanner is never a bad idea. Your phones are mini-computers, and just like your “big” computer – they need to be cleaned up from time to time. Malware and Virus threats can compromise information stored on your mobile devices. Malware has a snowball effect, and can continuously pile up until it slows downs or stops your device. Look for an MSP that offers Malwarebytes as a solution to this problem for both mobile devices and computers. It will keep your end points clean and secure from outsiders. Consider Webroot as an antivirus application that scans your downloaded apps and devices for any threats. Many MSPs offer Webroot antivirus in their managed IT services package. Equipped with Internet security, this defense will give you a heads up if it detects any malicious activity from your device’s browser.