Can You Trust Someone to | Smeester & Associates

Can You Trust Someone to “Vouch” for Your Company?

Can you really have faith in everything that’s on the internet? Of course, not. But, that being said, company leaders need to put an awful lot of trust in their employees, the people they’ve hired to manage their network, and the infrastructure and reliability of the network itself. But, if you’re expected to trust so many different factors revolving around your business, while also being told not to be too careful to trust everything else — like WiFi connections or suspicious emails — then how can you navigate your way around all this?

These days, having someone to vouch for you, or having someone vouch for the people you’ll be working with, is one of the oldest, yet most reliable ways to secure your network and your company. Going off of that, it’s equally important to have extra eyes helping to look out for your company at all times.

If the Dark Web does it, so can you?

If you’re familiar with the Dark Web, “trustworthy” wouldn’t necessarily be the first term you would use to describe it. But, believe it or not, sellers on Tor need to be verified for the authenticity of their products as well as themselves as users before being able to complete a transaction. This is done by having current members introduce new members through a system of vouching. Without this, you can’t get onto the site.

So, if the Dark Web relies on some form of vouching in order to be able to trust their users, then surely large companies should be doing something similar. It’s not enough to just have certain cybersecurity protocols in place — although, those are important as well. If you can incorporate a system of vouching along with placing outside eyes wherever you can, then you’ll be protected in ways that machines can’t protect you.

Apply this system to vendors and employees

Of course, companies find ways to vouch for people, too, similar to how it’s done on the Dark Web. When we hire someone, HR usually asks for references, recommendations, and will maybe even do some snooping around on social media to get to know more about this person. The same goes if you’re working with third-party vendors or onboarding and offboarding part-time employees. You need to know who you’re going to be working with. You can go this route, but you can also ask around to see who else has worked with the people you’re planning to work with. These days, it’s very easy to check a person’s or a company’s reputation online, so you can take advantage of this.

Hire someone to look out for you

If your Facebook account gets hacked and your friends find out because they are getting spam messages from you, it’s likely that one of those friends will notify you of this so that you are aware. In a sense, this is a form of informal (and free) cybersecurity. You’re too busy running things at the company to be concerned with staying on top of security, employees, networks, risks, etc. Therefore, hiring managed services to help you keep an eye on things internally and externally can help ensure that nothing fishy comes up.

Down to checks and balances

This idea of vouching further enforces the notion of checks and balances in a company who cares about its cybersecurity. A managed service provider checks the IT team, the IT team checks HR, the company checks the employees, and vigilant, trustworthy employees can keep their eyes out for the company. While a professional certainly helps handle this process at the expert level, it never hurts to rely on people you trust to keep things in balance.