social media cyber scams

Watch Out for These Common Social Media Cyber Scams

Social media is one of the most important things that companies use to drive their business. It’s an amazing way to get more connected to people, have constant communication with customers, and easily implement your inbound marketing campaigns. However, with every good thing, there’s usually a downside. And, the downside to utilizing social media too much is that you can quickly fall victim to a hack.

If your company uses social media at all with your business, then you must be aware of common social media cyber scams. Here they are:

When a Hacker Uses a Fake Social Media Account

Sometimes a hacker can impersonate a social media account user from a bank you use or a company you do business with. This is known as Angler Phishing.

Let’s say you go on Twitter or Facebook to get in touch with a company, either by making a tweet, a post, or sometimes, even sending a message. Something like, “Hey @appname, I need help with…” This is now public information. A hacker can then pose as the customer agent that wants to reply to your post.

In that message, they may add a link that looks exactly like a link that would come from the app company, bank, or whoever you’ve tweeted at. If you follow that link, it becomes very easy at that point for the hacker to get all your information. The solution? A reputable business probably won’t need to have you solve a problem this way. It’s always best to get in touch with someone directly from the company before making a bad mistake.

Hitting “Like” Buttons That Aren’t Really “Like” Buttons

It seems so simple, liking a post on Facebook. You do it every day, probably multiple times a day. But, when you yourself or an employee of your business goes to like something on Facebook, there’s a chance that that like button has been hacked as a means of tricking you. You thought you were giving an individual or an organization a compliment. But, now, you’ve just downloaded Malware onto your computer.

This is known as “likejacking.” These can spread like wildfire too, because after you’ve clicked that link, it can share it on your feed, putting your friends at risk, too.

Sneaky Subscriptions

Have you ever seen a quiz or game come up on your news feed? It looks like fun and all your friends are doing it. Plus, you’re pretty bored at the moment and any type of entertainment would be good right now. So, you decide to click the “play now” or “take the quiz” button. But, before you can start doing anything, it asks you for your phone number or email address.

Suddenly, you’ve just become a victim of a sneaky subscription social media cyber scam. You’ve been signed up for something without your consent. And, if you signed up with your cell phone number, a hefty amount has just been added to your monthly phone bill. Ouch.

A Believable Facebook Post by Shared By a Friend

When something is coming from a friend you know on Facebook, it has to be trusted, right? After all, your friend would probably know that he or she has been hacked, and would do something about it. But, the fact of the matter is that hacks have gotten a lot more believable over the years. Hackers know that people are able to identify hacks much easier than they’ve been able to in the past, so they’ve adjusted their hack accordingly.

So, when your friend shares something on Facebook that says something like, “Wow, check out this crazy video” with a link attached, DON’T click on it. Most of the time, the wording is made out to sound like your friend, and it sometimes takes a while before they even know this message is going around.

Fake Affiliate Program Promotions

You’re scrolling in a Facebook group you like or see an ad or post for an offer that sounds so intriguing. An airline you like is giving away a free trip if you get 100 likes. A store you shop at is giving out a giftcard if you just share their link. Does it sound too good to be true? Then it probably is. Remember, there’s no such thing as a free lunch. Don’t fall for something like this. It’s a very easy way to become a victim of a cyber scam.

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